News / Informations

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  • WEEKEND MASSES

    English

    Saturday: 4 p.m,

    Sunday:    7 a.m., 9 a.m.

     

    Spanish

    Saturday:  7 p.m.

    Sunday:    11 a.m

     

  • WEEKDAY MASSES

    English

    Monday to Saturday: 8 a.m.

    Monday to Friday 12:10 p.m. during Lent.

     

    Spanish

    Wednesday: 7 p.m. (in Spanish)

  • HOLY DAY MASSES

    As announced

  • CONFESSIONS

    Saturdays from 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. and

    Wednesdays from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

  • STAFF

    Rev. Francisco J. Anzoátegui, Pastor

    Rev. Gabino O. Macias, Parochial Vicar

    Rev. Peter F. DeFazio, Parochial Vicar

    Rev. Albert H. Stankard, Senior Priest in residence.

    Deacon: Pedro L. Torres

    Deacon: Alfredo Nieves

     

    Music Director and Organist: Cynthia Angelini

    Religious Education Coordinator:

       James J. Drummey

     

    Assistant Coordinator: María M. Nieves

    Pastoral Associate: Enrique Méndez

    Secretary: Gloria Villamil

    Financial Manager: Robert Percheski

    Sacristan: Pat Robinson

     

    Building and Grounds Supervisor:

        Carlos Rodriguez

It is with great joy that we announce that the Circus is

coming to Saint Stephen Parish on July 3rd and 4th! The traditional “old style” circus will present performances on Monday at 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. and Tuesday at 3:00. Support our Parish and buy your tickets in advance and save!!! Everyone is invited to come and watch the animals being unloaded and fed, the raising of the giant big top, and being part of this great fund-raiser for our Parish.

Ticket prices will be $6 for children 11 and under and

$12 for those 12 and over. Children under 2 will not require a ticket if accompanied by an adult ticket holder. The prices will jump on the day of the circus to $8 and $16, respectively.

For the first 200 adult tickets sold in advance, St. Stephen gets 20 percent. The parish will get 40 percent for tickets #201 and up if they are sold in advance.

The Power of the Holy Spirit

    For three years prior to His Ascension into Heaven, Jesus had been trying to educate the Apostles about the Kingdom of God and what their role would be in spreading that Kingdom. But it wasn’t until the Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles on Pentecost that they finally began to understand what the Lord had been telling them.

     The Spirit not only gave them the gifts of wisdom, understanding, and knowledge, He also gave them the gift of fortitude or courage that would be essential if they were to survive the coming persecution. James was murdered in Jerusalem in the year 42, Peter and Paul were executed in Rome around the years 65 to 67, and the other Apostles, with the exception of John, were also brutally killed.

     All they had to say to escape death was that Jesus was not God, that He had not risen from the dead, and that their whole mission was a lie. But they persevered in the face of terrible persecution because they knew Jesus had risen and that they, too, would one day rise from the dead and spend an eternity of joy with Him in Heaven.

     Fast forward 2,000 years and we find thousands of our fellow Christians giving up their lives rather than renounce Jesus. Would you be willing to die for Jesus if confronted by enemies of our Faith? Or would you be willing to live for Jesus in a culture that is hostile to our beliefs?

    Only the naïve can think that we will not soon face such a crisis in our lives. Will you be like St. Peter and deny even knowing Jesus, or will you proudly say that He is your friend and that you will never turn your back on Him? To do this, you must rely on the power of the Holy Spirit.

 

Farewell for Fr. Bert and Fr. Gabino plus, NEW Confession Schedule

 — As we announce last week-end, two of our beloved and great priests of this parish, will be moving on to new chapters in their lives: Father Bert has received notice of an opening at Regina Cleri and Fr. Gabino has been assigned to go to South Boston to help in a new parish. Their farewell celebration will be Saturday, June 24, at the 4:00 p.m. Mass immediately followed by a reception in our parish hall. Let us all come and thank them for a job well done in their years of service to our parish.

Because we are losing two priests, we will have to make some adjustments as we go along so that, we continue to serve the needs of all here, and do it in the most effective manner. The first adjustment is that, beginning in July, we will go back to have confessions only on Saturday from 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. and by appointment. Last Wednesday confessions will be June 29, thanks.

Adult Formation

 — To help you to know your Catholic

Faith better, we have been making available in the front foyer of the Church books and CDs that are both interesting and informative — and inexpensive. Here are some of the latest CDs available for your purchase:

 The Treasure of Our Soul: The Apostles’ Creed by Scott Hahn; Love, Sacrifice,and Trust by Fr. Mike Schmitz; Chaplet of Divine Mercy in Song by Vicki Kueppers, Who Am I to Judge by Edward

Sri; Religionless Spirituality: Why We Need the

Church by Tim Gray; Building Your Life on Rock by Ralph Martin; Put Not Your Trust in Princes by Christopher Check; and The Ultimate Goal: Why I Left Pro Soccer to Answer God’s Call by Sr. Raffaella Cavallin.

 

There are also some valuable Q and A books (Catholic

Replies 1 and 2) to answer any questions you have.

The Gift of Fatherhood

As we celebrate Father’s Day this weekend, we are aware that fatherhood is under attack today

 — on TV sitcoms where fathers are often portrayed as morons or in real life where there are efforts to eliminate the word “father” and replace it with “parent” or “partner.” But fathers, if they follow the guidance of “Our Father” in Heaven, are a vital part of the family, and of society, since the family is the basic unit of society. Without strong fathers, we won’t have strong families, and without strong families, our society will collapse. We call God Father because Jesus told us to do so and because God is the first origin of everything and at the same time the perfect role model of goodness and loving care for His children. Thus, we associate with fathers such good qualities as protective love, fidelity, leadership, strength, security, and stability, and we should not be swayed against using this term of endearment by those who promote negative images of fatherhood based on the failings of fallible human fathers. Instead of wondering what gifts you would like this Father’s Day, may we suggest to all fathers reading this that you ask yourself, “What gift can I give to my family?” How about being a more loving spouse to your wife and a more loving and involved father to your children? How about being truly interested in what is important to each of them, setting aside quality time to listen and support them? How about praying with the family, going to Mass together with them, reading the Bible, and discussing religion together? A Christ-like father can be the greatest gift to his wife and to his children. Happy Father’s Day!

Do We Have to Love Our Enemies?

In today’s Gospel, Jesus tells us to love our enemies, which is a very difficult thing to do. But Jesus doesn’t ask us to do anything that He didn't do first. Recall that on the Cross, when so many were jeering Him, Jesus asked His Father in Heaven to forgive His enemies.

Down through the centuries, many disciples of Jesus have followed the difficult path of forgiving their enemies. Thus, Pope St, John Paul II in 1981 went to the prison where the man who had tried to kill him was being held and forgave him.

Another remarkable disciple is Immaculee Ilibagiza, who survived the horrors of the Rwanda genocide in the 1990s, when she and six other women hid for 91 days in a hotel bathroom while her parents and nearly one million Rwandan Tutsis were killed by rival Hutus out of racial hatred.

 

How did Immaculee survive? “I said 27 rosaries every day,” she said. “And I counted! I had nothing else to do in the bathroom, so I said 27 rosaries every day and 40 Di-vine Mercy chaplets every day. We never spoke with each other. All we did was pray …. It helped my sanity.”

She said that while she was praying, she realized she was not being honest with God in that she was asking for His forgiveness without extending forgiveness to her enemies. So she fell to her knees and “begged God to help me. I want to feel peace, I want to forgive. I want to be part of You, but I don’t know how to forgive, and if I don’t for-give, I don’t feel like I’m being honest with You. And He did, which again is a grace. Because what helped me to forgive was when Jesus was dying on the Cross.”

To read more about this amazing woman, see her best-selling book Left to Tell.

Saint Stephen Parish  - Framingham Massachusetts